Grow Great Evaluators!

QuaverSEL lesson focuses on evaluation skills and helps students determine reliable resources

For the first time ever, many students are finding themselves learning entirely online. Though the Internet has many incredible benefits and can be an amazing learning tool, it also opens up a world of misinformation and unreliable resources. 

Outside of school, students may seek information about current events, personal issues, and more. Knowing the sources they can trust and being able to identify an unreliable source are important skills. 

Today, we’re going to dig into a lesson all about responsible decision-making and evaluating information. 

This lesson, “Evaluating Information,” can be found in Lesson 24 in the 5th grade curriculum.

Quaver SEL Lesson 24 in the 5th grade curriculum, lesson all about responsible decision-making and evaluating information.

The purpose of this lesson is for students to be able to evaluate the accuracy and truthfulness of information from a variety of sources.

Let’s dig in!

The following activities are appropriate for 5th grade+ students. 

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Topic Discussion

The lesson begins with a fun question game. Students will be able to pick a box to reveal a question. For example, “Who can you ask if you feel confused about the trustworthiness of a source?” This screen is a great discussion tool to help explore students’ prior knowledge. 

Activity lesson where students pick a box to reveal a question. For example, “Who can you ask if you feel confused about the trustworthiness of a source?”

Lesson Mindset

The Lesson Mindset screen reminds students of the theme of this lesson: “Don’t believe everything you read.” Remind students that this theme doesn’t just apply to school, but to other areas of our lives. 

Students can select a number of interactive activities that reinforce the theme. 

Lesson Mindset “Don’t believe everything you read.” reinforces the theme of evaluating the accuracy and truthfulness of a variety of information from different sources.

Don’t Believe Everything You Read

This story reinforces the theme of evaluating the accuracy and truthfulness of a variety of information from different sources. The story introduces Annika, who learns a lesson about not believing everything she reads. Annika reads an article that says that only men can be aerospace engineers, and she worries and wonders if this is true. 

The story outlines four ways to evaluate a source of information:

  • Is the information coming from someone I trust?
  • Do I think the information is true?
  • What evidence is provided?
  • Is this based on facts? 

Students can also consult a trusted adult!

The story outlines four ways to evaluate a source of information

Is It Trustworthy?

This activity addresses the theme of evaluating the accuracy and truthfulness of information from different sources. In the age of technology, it’s easy for information and news to get misconstrued or passed along without proper citation. What sources can we trust? What sources might give incorrect information?

This activity addresses the theme of evaluating the accuracy and truthfulness of information from different sources.

Circle Up

This screen encourages a community gathering discussion about the theme of the lesson  Because this screen encourages students to gather in a group, you might adapt this screen to work in a distance learning environment or forgo it altogether. 

Remind students of the community gathering guidelines and address the prompt: “Tell us about a time you believed a source that turned out to be untrustworthy. How could what we learned today have helped you?” 

In a distance learning environment, this could be a discussion via Zoom or another video meeting platform. You might also encourage students to send you their response privately. 

This screen encourages a community gathering discussion about the theme of the lesson

Reflections and Other Thoughts

Remind students that this week we have been talking about the importance of evaluating information.

As you listen to the audio, ask students to reflect on how they might use this new knowledge this year. 

Reflections and Other Thoughts Activity for Evaluating Information include ask students to reflect on how they might use this new knowledge this year.

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Facing school closure due to COVID-19? Find tips on distance teaching and free, ready-to-use resources at QuaverSEL.com/Care2020