New Study: QuaverSEL significantly improves student SEL skills

Findings show conclusive evidence.

by Kristin Clark Taylor

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The results of the independent study by SEG Measurement are in.  The evidence is clear and compelling:

Students who are taught using QuaverSEL resources achieve “significantly greater growth” in social and emotional skills than students who are not.

The popular curriculum, has both a mission and a mandate: To create a “culture of caring” in elementary classrooms throughout the nation and around the world.

A few highlights of the independently-conducted study:

  • The study compared social and emotional development between a treatment group of students who used QuaverSEL and a matched group of students who did not. Those who did use QuaverSEL demonstrated significantly greater social and emotional development.
  • The study revealed that QuaverSEL has a broad, positive, across-the-board impact; i.e., the benefits are equally effective with boys and girls, and with students of varied ethnic backgrounds.
  • Ninety percent of the teachers who participated in the qualitative evaluation reported they would definitely or probably use — and recommend — QuaverSEL in the future.

Learn more about what sets QuaverSEL apart from the rest at QuaverEd.com/sel.

When asked to respond to the results of the report, one educator was not at all surprised.  

Tyrone Thompkins, a school counselor at Crestview Elementary in Miami Gardens, Florida says, “I see the benefits QuaverSEL brings to my own students every single day, so I can’t say I’m all that surprised to hear about these results.”

Thompkins, who was not a part of the study, says he uses QuaverSEL, “as a tool that really helps me reach my students.”

“I’m going to just lay it out,” Thompkins continues. “Many of the students I see come from challenged backgrounds – single-family homes, foster homes, many live with their grandparents, many face economic challenges – so they’re walk into my office already trying to process and deal with strong emotions.”

“When we play some of the SEL songs and they have a chance to play some of the interactive games, it gives them comfort – especially my younger ones who might not be able to read the lessons all that well. In these days and times, having a safe space and the right tools to express your emotions is just really important.”

To be sure, the results of this new study arrive at a critical juncture in our history, as teachers and counselors throughout the nation and the world struggle with the pandemic-related challenges of reaching and teaching their students in a way that ensures their social and emotional well-being and growth.

“These are kind of dark times,” Thompkins says. “And I’m going to do everything I can to make sure I give my students everything they need to make it through.”

Thompkins is certainly not alone, as this new study suggests.

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Kristin Clark Taylor is a journalist and author.

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